When is dreaming waking? Continuity, lucidity and transcendence in modern contexts of dreaming

  • Raymond L.M. Lee (Author)
    University of Malaya Kuala Lumpur Malaysia
    I was previously an associate professor in the department of anthropology & sociology at the University of Malaya. I retired from teaching in 2005 but continue to publish as an independent researcher. My interest in dreaming goes back to my research on religion in the 1970s-1990s. Although I am not engaged in experimental work, my research on dreaming focuses on personal experiences, especially in lucid dreaming and how it relates to religious and spiritual interpretations.

Identifiers (Article)

Abstract

The continuity hypothesis suggests that dreaming is not fully independent of our waking lives. Several factors common to waking have been demonstrated to manifest in the dream-state. Yet, unusual instances of being awake in dreaming may represent autochthonous forms of consciousness that are not necessarily correlated with the parameters of the waking world. This juxtaposition of continuity/discontinuity parallels the natural attitude in the waking world and challenges to it in reenchantment. Addressing the correspondencce between debates on continuity/discontinuity and contextual changes may provide an alternative perspective for redefining the boundaries between waking and dreaming.

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Published
2015-05-18
Section
Commentaries
Language
en
Keywords
continuity; lucid dreaming; natural attitude; reenchantment; transcendence