Self-rated effects of reading, TV viewing and daily activities on dreaming in adolescents and adults: The UK library study

  • Sebastian Lambrecht (Author)
  • Michael Schredl (Author)
    Central Institute of Mental Health, Mannheim, Germany
  • Josie Henley-Einion (Author)
  • Mark Blagrove (Author)

Identifiers (Article)

Abstract

The continuity hypothesis of dreaming states that our daily activities like reading books and watching films, movies and shows should be represented in our dreams. The majority of participants of the UK library study (N = 1375) stated that their dreams are affected by their reading and TV consumption, and by their daily activities. The more time they spend with an activity, the more likely they reported an effect of this activity on dreaming. Future studies should use daily logs and dream diaries to validate the present findings. In addition, measures of emotional intensity of the waking life experience and attitude towards dreaming should be included as these factors might have an effect on the continuity between waking and dreaming.

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Published
2013-04-25
Section
Articles
Language
en
Keywords
Dreaming; Continuity hypothesis; ; Reading; TV consumption
How to Cite
Lambrecht, S., Schredl, M., Henley-Einion, J., & Blagrove, M. (2013). Self-rated effects of reading, TV viewing and daily activities on dreaming in adolescents and adults: The UK library study. International Journal of Dream Research, 6(1), 41-44. https://doi.org/10.11588/ijodr.2013.1.9724